Thursday, 7 July 2016

Prejudice


Prejudice 
It was a windy day, the leaves were blowing about. The children were playing on the field.  But there was one person alone with no one sitting  with all he had was a lunch box. The other children were speaking a different language and no one wanted to play with him because he was from another country.  How would that make you feel? We need to improve how we treat immigrants because 4.3 percent or an estimated 143,000 New Zealanders said they had been discriminated against either while at work. 

Once one of my friends was misjudged by a person in my class. He said you can't play rugby because you play football. Then I put myself in his shoes and I thought how he would feel really bad. But he kept playing he was very brave  because wanted to try a new sport out. Then I went up to him and said “Are you okay?” he said yes. 

Prejudice is when is when you judge someone on the way they look or when someone says you can't do this because you do something else. For example you play basketball because you're tall or you play rugby because you're strong. This is another example of prejudice: boys smell, don't do any homework, like rugby, are dumb,  have no willpower. Girls run like a girl, scream like a girl, girls are smart. They have willpower. Or Asian drivers are bad at driving or foreigners drive on the wrong side of the road. People should keep prejudiced ideas to themselves so we don't upset immigrants or foreigners. 

We interviewed many immigrants to find out what actions made them feel welcome.  We learnt we should say hello so they feel welcome and be friendly at the same time. Then they will feel really welcome in the school or city. Or include them in your game so they feel included. Over time they will feel more welcome and included if, when you get to know them more, you could ask where they're from or you could talk to them and get to know them even more and treat them like what they are, normal person. That will make them feel much better about themselves. When they get to know you, invite them to a party or play. Then they will feel they belong here.

We interviewed many immigrants to find out what actions made the feel unwelcome. We found out that people are staring at them laughing and teasing them, whispering about them, and being mean in general that is very bad for immigrants living in New Zealand. That is a big problem for us and everyone who comes here. The worse things people have been saying are: “Do you have a bomb in your lunch box?” That is just terribly mean and we have to do something.

We have been interviewing immigrants from different countries to find out some tips or advice for how should treat immigrants in NZ. We have found out that we should:
Treat them like everyone else 
Help them 
Smile at them 
Make conversation 
Be kind and caring 
Include them 
Invite them to something 
Host a welcome party 

 This is important to know what prejudice is so we don't spread prejudice.  Then not so many people will feel discriminated against and they will feel more welcome in their new school or city. If we do all of this not so many people will feel alienated in New Zealand.






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